Web Analytics Made Easy -
StatCounter
Parents of Ole Miss | Local Resources | Forum

Parents of Ole Miss Forum

Check out the chat rooms below, all about being a Parent of Ole Miss!

Orientation Weekend

All things orientation. Who's going to be here and which sessions? We can't wait to have everybody in Oxford!
 Views
6Posts

Graduation Weekend

Questions about graduation plans? Ask away!
 Views
1Posts

Meet and Greet

Come on in! Welcome to the Ole Miss Family. Here you will meet fellow Ole Miss Parents
 Views
4Posts

Ride Share

Looking for a ride for your child? Talk it up here!
 Views
0Posts

Academic

Want to chat about academics? Come on in. No one is grading you here!
 Views
0Posts

Social Scene

Want to talk about social stuff? Bring it on in this chat room!
 Views
4Posts

Rentals & Real Estate

Want to discuss the rental options or real estate in the 38655? Here ya go!
 Views
13Posts

The Kitchen Sink

Not sure where to post your question or comment? Come here, its everything but the kitchen sink.
 Views
4Posts

Rebel Access

Come chat about your experiences with special needs at Ole Miss
 Views
0Posts
New Posts
  • Renting an apartment has its benefits and, in theory, once you rent one, it’s your landlord that has to deal with all the costs of maintenance. Also, many apartment complexes have their own swimming pool or gyms, which are amenities you usually instantly gain access to when you rent the apartment, and all for the fixed weekly or monthly amount you pay for the apartment. However, in reality, there will still be some issues you’ll have to tackle in most rental apartments. Here are some of the most common problems you can come across when renting and ways to deal with them. You can’t make any changes on your own Even though the apartment you’re renting doesn’t belong to you, it’s still your home, albeit a temporary one. It’s only natural that you’ll want to decorate it so that it reflects your personality and you feel comfortable and cosy when you’re there. This may prove to be problematic, depending on what your landlord is like. For instance, changing the wall paint can make the space more cheerful and more to your liking, but some landlords simply won’t allow you to do this kind of work. However, it doesn’t hurt to ask, so put some effort into establishing good communication with the owner of the apartment. In case this option doesn’t work for you, you can still introduce some personal style to your rental apartment by investing in things such as removable wallpaper, magnet covers for nasty-looking appliances and various cushions and throws for your beds and sofas. Also, some potted plants, a few framed photos in the right place and some new curtains can do wonders for any space. The kitchens can be dreadful If you’ve lived in a rented apartment before, you’ve probably already encountered this problem. Generally, landlords aren’t really keen on making big investments when it comes to their rentals. They’ll usually go for the cheapest possible version of everything, including the kitchen. This means that you’ll end up with a kitchen that looks less than attractive and doesn’t really cater to your needs. And although students don’t really cook as much as families, every tenant should be able to utilize every part of their kitchen. So, for instance, if the drawers won’t open properly, try jiggling them and fixing them, and if you can’t, move the cooking tools you use most often onto your kitchen tops or hang them on the wall. Similarly, if the cabinet doors are hanging unevenly and can’t be opened and closed well, you can simply take them off and have an open cabinet or two. However, if you notice any serious problems, you should contact your landlord immediately and tell them what’s wrong. Things like drains, pipes or hot water systems that don’t work will require professional kitchen plumbing , so make sure your landlord gets experienced plumbers to resolve the issue. The bathrooms often need renovation Just like your kitchen, your bathroom can also be outdated and some fixtures might even be damaged or dysfunctional. This can be very inconvenient, so you should try and improve the situation by first talking to your landlord and checking if there’s anything he’d be willing to do in terms of bathroom remodelling. However, since this isn’t something landlords frequently do, you should take things into your own hands and fix what you can. It’s now easy to find quality stickers for covering up old and damaged tiles, or some new accessories, such as bathmats or shower curtains, so that the place looks nicer. You can also replace the lighting fixtures with some new ones, but be sure you save the ones you take down, so that you have the option of putting them back before you move out. Furthermore, changing the toilet seat is really not much of an investment, and neither is a small floating shelf. Finding affordable solutions to fixing up a bathroom doesn’t have to be difficult if you give it some thought. The by-laws may not suit you Not all rental-apartment problems have to be about the state of the apartment itself. Some are caused by the rules you have to follow when you move into a new building. So, before you put down a deposit for an apartment, you should get familiar with the by-laws that the owners of the building have created . Although many of them will actually make sense and are only there to ensure you and all the other residents can function normally, there will always be some you won’t agree with. Some of these by-laws can forbid you to keep a pet in your apartment, or to take a shower when you get home late from work. You may also find that it’s against the rules to either smoke or hang your clean laundry to dry on your balcony. You may also get a notice or even a fine if your guests are too loud for the other tenants, or if you don’t participate in keeping the common areas clean. That’s why it’s essential that you’re aware of any such by-laws before you move in, so that you can look for an apartment elsewhere if they don’t suit you. Nobody’s living arrangements are truly ideal, so make the best of yours by knowing what problems you might face and learning how to manage them efficiently.
  • Sharing a space with a roommate can be tricky, whether you’ve known each other for years or found each other through classifieds. Unless you’re very lucky, the two of you are likely to have different tastes when it comes to interior décor – you might be a sworn Bohemian, while she prefers minimalist simplicity of Japandi. However, even this union of different decor preferences can work if you apply some of these tips. In the end, your effort could result in a more beautiful and eclectic space than you could imagine. Invest in durable pieces Sharing a space with roomies means having more people around all the time. This means that high-traffic areas such as entryways and shared bathroom will need more frequent cleaning, but also means more wear and tear on furniture and fixtures. For this reason, you should avoid budget furnishings and instead stick to more quality items. Although veneer coffee tables are affordable, they're likely to chip or show other signs of damage in the first six months. For roughly the same price, you can get a used real wood table in great condition, which you can then restore yourselves. While they may cost more upfront, durable furnishings last longer and age better, so consider pooling your money among yourselves for pieces that are worthy of investment. Start with neutral palettes While you may initially want to make your design taste dominant, especially if you own the place or you're the longest-present tenant, that approach doesn't always work with your roomies, especially if your tastes are a bit off-beat. So, instead of insisting on leopard print sofa throws and larger than life photo print tapestries, stick to quality pieces which are more neutral, such as pastel drapes and non-patterned, natural fibre rugs. From there, you and your roommate can work together in bringing details that add more personality and character to the space, without pulling in any of directions. This way, both of you will feel that you had some say in the décor, without being too pushy. Your bedroom = your sanctuary If your shared space has turned into an exuberant hodgepodge of styles and you want a patch of it to be your no-flight zone, the bedroom is the right spot, as it might be the only space in the house where you have full creative control of your décor. While your lease terms may not allow you to squeeze in a frameless shower stall, you can personalize the space with window treatments, furniture, and the choice of lighting. Don’t try to dismantle the existing light fixtures yourself. In Australia, for example, unlicensed electrical work is even subject to a fine, so renters and even homeowners would rather call a local electrician than install lighting themselves. This certified electrician in Campbelltown is just an example of what you need – gives fair quotes, provides reliable local service, and even operates a 24-hour emergency standby. Don’t surrender function to form When you live together, it's easy to lose composition when someone doesn't do their dishes or puts things where they belong. An organized, minimalistic design can partially put an end to those squabbles, but an even more effective solution is to provide a lot of public storage like shelving, dish racks, and trays for kitchen essentials that are easily cleaned and organised. If you have plenty of wall space, you can combine spice racks and shelves for cookbooks with utensil racks and hangers for cutting boards. Embrace eclectic styles Apart from being artsy and chic, a plant-rich bohemian décor is highly trending these days. Originating among hip, millennial urban dwellers, this style is easy to achieve and maintain when you have roommates, as it’s based on mixing and matching styles. The pieces that fit the bohemian décor may come from a wide array of sources, from thrift stores and flea markets, over your grandma's attic, to big-box retailers and garage sales. Going with an eclectic décor such as bohemian, allows you to harmonise common spaces – how can you otherwise have a reclaimed couch, IKEA coffee table, and a vintage heirloom chair sitting in the same room without it sounding like the beginning of a joke? Sharing an apartment with roommates can be good for your finances, but not so good if you’re about to design the apartment of your dreams. As in all joint undertakes, honesty is your best tool, as without each of you expressing their wishes and preferences, you can go on tiptoeing around each other without ever achieving the look either of you loves.
  • Regardless of your child’s age, each new school year always brings mixed emotions and expectations. Everyone surely feels some excitement of a new beginning but it’s most often followed by concern as to how well the child will do at school and how much progress they’ll make. Moreover, expectations are different: parents always hope for good grades and useful skills whereas kids typically just want to have some fun and get as least amount of homework as possible. It’s certainly challenging to balance out these expectations but it can be done so that your child improves their academic performance and prospects of a successful career later in life. Create a daily routine and stick to it One of the essential ingredients of your child's success in school is their parents' interest and involvement. Unfortunately, for many them, the biggest obstacle in finding time in their hectic daily schedules. One solution lies in the creation of a daily timetable that includes homework and study time clearly stated with the time to relax, eat and unwind. These periods may vary and will depend on your child’s interest and your family’s rhythm but whatever you decide on, it’s essential you stay consistent so that you both can develop a healthy routine and stick to it. Designate a working space Having a designated work station can help kids focus better on their studies but this doesn’t necessarily mean you have to be rigid and insist on it being a desk. Some kids prefer doing their studying on their bed or on the floor as it allows them more freedom of movement, but it’s important there are no distractions. What matters most is that they feel relaxed and comfortable in that space and that they have all their work material at hand, so even if it’s not a typical desk, all the books, pens, papers and notebook can be all stored in a portable box. Establish ground rules In order to develop a functioning system, you need to establish ground rules. To help your kids complete their duties and stay organised, there need to be rules and clear structure. It’s best you keep them posted in the open for everyone to see what their responsibilities are in any given moment and you can even resort to giving certain incentives for work well done – it could be a fun activity such as going to the park or the cinema, as well as reasonable repercussions if rules were broken. Ask for professional help A significant part of the support system for your child’s academic performance is recognising when it’s time to get professional guidance and assistance. Many American and Australian students during their middle and high school age admit they struggle with calculus, maths, chemistry and physics and if these are not your areas of expertise, it’s advisable to find help. Don’t wait too long or for your child to ask for help, rather turn to maths tutoring experts who can offer their knowledge and expertise and by following the national curriculum, create individualized plans for your child’s needs and focus on achieving your desired goals. It’s also very important to bear in mind your child’s age, interests and abilities so you can have realistic expectations which don’t necessarily have to mean just higher grades. Encourage their curiosity Children are naturally curious and it’s an important ingredient of their development. Encourage them to explore and step out of their comfort zones by trying out new things and learning more about those things that spark their imagination. It often happens that the choice of their future line of work comes gradually as they continue exploring their interests. Sometimes it’s hard for teens to make up their minds about who they want to be and this is mostly due to the fact that their pre-frontal cortex, which is in charge of the decision making, is still developing during adolescence. That’s why it’s important you talk to your teenage kid about their interests in and out of school, encourage them to go wider and deeper in their passions and reassure them that if they go for one option now, it doesn’t mean they have to commit to it forever. Also, encourage them to test out their knowledge and skills in a part-time job so they can get a feel of the type of work they might enjoy in future. With these tips, your constant support and a positive attitude towards your child's abilities and performance, you can expect great results and long-term success.

Resources

Parentsofolemiss.com is not an official site of the University of Mississippi, nor does it reflect the opinions or recommendations of the University of Mississippi.

© 2019 by Parents of Ole Miss. Proudly created by